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Ham Hill

Ham Hill general view into valley - Steve Day

Walk in ancient footsteps among wildflowers

Ham Hill is a tiny area of steeply sloping chalk downland strewn with wildflowers. The views from the top of the embankment on a bright, clear day are unforgettable.

You will find this nature reserve alongside the road from Ham to Buttermere.

A good path runs through the whole reserve along the bottom of the northwest facing slope. A flight of steps leads to the top of the embankment and on through the ash woodland, exiting at the southern end.

The reserve is part of a holloway (or sunken trackway) dating back to Saxon or medieval times on the route from Hungerford to Andover.

It was formed by the trudging of many feet over hundreds of years either climbing or descending from the chalk downland into the lower lying Vale of Pewsey.

The banks are a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest for their rich variety of plants and wildlife. There are trees at the bottom of the valley.


Find out more about Ham Hill's wildlife or find out how we manage the reserve

Ham Hill chaffinch © Graham Coules WWT 190x130 Ham Hill duke of burgundy © Stephen Davies WWT 190x130

CategoryChalk Downland
PostcodeSN8 3RG

Download reserve location map

Download reserve map

How to get here

OS Map grid reference - SU333617

Nearest town - Hungerford

Access –This reserve is not suitable for pushchairs and wheelchairs. Please stay on the path and do not climb the northwest-facing slope as this will damage wildflowers, particularly the orchids. Dogs on leads are welcome.

Size – 1.51 hectares / 3.7 acres

Status – designated Site of Special Scientific Interest

Habitats – chalk downland

Don’t miss - musk orchid, burnt orchid, chalkhill blue, green hairstreak, roman snail

Other reserves nearbyJones’s Mill

 

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